refinishing shelves: materials

refinishing shelves: materials

Thanks for listening - I'm off my soapbox. Now back to what we're here for, how to refinish wood furniture (for example, a soap box). 

Before I get into the step-by-step process I followed for refinishing, I thought I'd first go through my materials list. I'd recommend collecting everything you're going to need before getting started on a project like this. I bought most of my supplies at my local ACE Hardware store, but it's also largely available on Amazon. Here's what I used:

Plastic Drop Cloth: Ultimately whether or not you need this depends on where you plan to work on your project. But chances are you're going to want something to help keep the space around you clean and protected. I worked on my project outside on our porch, and in addition to the tarp, I also needed lots of heavy objects to keep it from blowing around. 

Nice to Have or Necessity? Unless you're okay with paint on the floor, use a drop cloth.

Buy it here.

Sandpaper: You're going to need to prep the furniture to help the paint properly adhere. You actually use sandpaper several times across the course of the project, and you'll use several different grits (refers to how course the sandpaper is) as well.

Nice to Have or Necessity? Sandpaper is a necessity, but this particular kit is a nice to have. The sanding tool in this kit gives your hand some relief, and the variety pack of sandpapers provides you with the different types of grit you'll need.

Buy it here.

Cloths: As I mentioned above, you'll be doing a lot of sanding while you refinish your furniture, which will leave behind a lot of residue. Before applying paint, you'll want a method for wiping down the furniture. If you don't want to buy something specifically for this purpose, an old shirt or rags will work just fine.

Nice to Have or Necessity? Sanding creates dust. Dust is not good when painting.

Buy something similar here.

Wood Filler: If you have any imperfections or nail holes, wood filler can help your furniture look brand new again. You can find wood filler in a variety of colors. Because I knew I was priming and painting my furniture, I went with white. But if you plan to stain instead, you can apply the wood filler after you've finished in a color close to your stain.

Nice to Have or Necessity? If you're looking for a clean, polished look, you'll want to patch holes.

Buy it here.

Primer: If you're painting over a dark colored paint, the purpose seems evident. But primer is also really important for creating a consistent paint job and preventing the paint from chipping over time.

Nice to Have or Necessity? Unless you're staining, you'll want to do at least one coat of primer. And more than likely, you'll want to do at least two coats.

Buy it here.

Paint Brush/Roller Kit and Polycrylic Brush: There are tons of different kinds of brushes you can use. I liked doing a combo of foam brushes and rollers for the primer and the paint. The foam brushes are really effective at getting into the corners and creases, and the roller creates a very smooth finish and aids in a speedy application. For the polycrylic finish, you'll want a synthetic brush like the one in the second link below.

Nice to Have or Necessity? You can use whatever brushes you'd like, but the roller simplifies and speeds the process (not to mention that you get much fewer noticeable brush strokes with the roller).

Buy it here and here.

Paint: My favorite part :)  I could spend hours in front of those paint swatch displays at the hardware store. So many choices. I recommend a semi-gloss interior paint finish. I got a paint and primer combo, but still also used a primer before applying the paint. I knew I wanted to go with a medium gray, so I collected paint swatches and brought them home to hold up against the wall color. I went with Benjamin Moore: Stone.

Nice to Have or Necessity? I guess unless you're staining, but then it's just stain instead of paint.

Buy it at your local paint or hardware store.

Protective Finish: The last thing you're going to do is seal your project. This not only protects the furniture and the paint job you labored over, but it also provides a finished, wipeable surface that will help sustain your furniture over time.

Nice to Have or Necessity? If you want a high quality, finished look to your project, I'd highly recommend using a sealant coat.

Buy it here.

If you're ready to get started, stay tuned. Across the next week I'll be posting about the step-by-step process I followed to refinish my shelves.

refinishing shelves: prep

refinishing shelves: prep

nanny sarah

nanny sarah